When Should I Update my Drupal Site to Drupal 8?

Last year Drupal 8 finally arrived, and brought the question that comes with every new release of Drupal: when should I update? New releases of Drupal mean two things: new features and cool new tools, and the retirement of an old version. We got the power and flexibility of Symfony and Drupal 6 sites are no longer getting community support. Unlike WordPress, which has well defined upgrade paths, each version of Drupal is a new adventure in upgrade pain. The more I watch people suffer with this pain, and the more I watch them try to find a way to do upgrades that preserve their site’s fundamental structure, the more I come to the conclusion that this pain is telling us something: we’re doing it wrong. Not because Drupal’s strategy is wrong, but because keeping all your content in the same structures is usually wrong. Drupal 8 should not make it easy for you to continue to use an old strategy, it should encourage us to update old assumptions.

Here is how I encourage everyone to view their choices:

If you have a Drupal 6 (or older) site you should update right now. Drupal 6 is no longer getting security updates so you are on borrowed time. But more importantly Drupal 8 is a better tool for the current state of the web than your Drupal 6 site. Most sites running on D6 reflect an online communications strategy that’s at least 4 or 5 years old. Those sites probably aren’t responsive, aren’t prepared to support apps, don’t have the right focus on social media and user engagement, and make assumptions about user behaviors that have evolved. Skip to Drupal 8: do not migrate these sites to Drupal 7. If there is a tool that is missing from Drupal 8 that your current site uses make sure you need it before complaining (or paying to have someone port it for you). Maybe that tool hasn’t been ported because it doesn’t make sense anymore. Some things are still missing, but lots of things are being rewritten differently because we have a better platform. The community is smarter than it was 5 or 10 years ago, and the platform is better, take the time to figure out why something hasn’t been ported: is it just no one has bothered, or has something better been built instead?

If you have a Drupal 7 site you should update when your web site no longer supports your work.  This is actually the same advice I just gave, but without a few assumptions like “you need a secure site.” Many Drupal 7 sites have a lot of life left in them. A site you built today will be designed to meet the needs you have now, and the ones you foresee in the near future. Three years from now (when Drupal 7 is scheduled to lose support from the community) you will be operating on assumptions that have probably been wrong for at least two years. Every six months you should ask yourself: does my site reflect my online strategy, and is my strategy still working? If the answer is yes to both of those questions you are fine, if the answer is no to either – particularly the second – you should engage someone to help you update your strategy and rebuild your site.

I’ve been part of projects that failed in part because we tried to port a stale strategy and stale content to a fresh site. We broke the new site before it even launched. Don’t try to make Drupal 8 behave like your old site: embrace the change.

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