Drupal 8 Batch Services

For this month’s South Carolina Drupal User Group I gave a talk about creating Batch Services in Drupal 8. As a quick side note we are trying to include video conference access to all our meetings so please feel free to join us even if you cannot come in person.

Since Drupal 8 was first released I have been frustrated by the fact that Drupal 8 batch jobs were basically untouched from previous versions. There is nothing strictly wrong with that approach, but it has never felt right to me particularly when doing things in a batch job that I might also want to do in another context – that really should be a service and I should write those core jobs first. After several frustrating experiences trying to find a solution I like, I finally created a module that provides an abstract class that can be used to create a service that handles this problem just more elegantly. The project also includes an example module to provide a sample service.

Some of the text in the slides got cut off by the Zoom video window, so I uploaded them to SlideShare as well:


Quick Batch Overview

If you are new to Drupal batches there are lots of articles around that go into details of traditional implementations, so this will be a super quick overview.

To define a batch you generate an array in a particular format – typically as part of a form submit process – and pass that array to batch_set(). The array defines some basic messages, a list of operations, a function to call when the batch is finished, and optionally a few other details. The minimal array would be something like:

  <?php  // Setup final batch array.
    $batch = [
      'title'    => 'Page title',
      'init_message' => 'Openning message',
      'operations'  => [],
      'finished' => '\some\class\namespace\and\name::finishedBatch',
    ];

The interesting part should be in that operations array, which is a list of tasks to be run, but getting all your functions setup and the batch array generated can often be its own project.

Each operation is a function that implements callback_batch_operation(), and the data to feed that function. The callbacks are just functions that have a final parameter that is an array reference typically called $context. The function can either perform all the needed work on the provided parameters, or perform part of that work and update the $context['sandbox']['finished'] value to be a number between 0 and 1. Once finished reaches 1 (or isn’t set at the end of the function) batch declares that task complete and moves on to the next one in the queue. Once all tasks are complete it calls the function provided as the finished value of the array that defined the batch.

The finish function implements callback_batch_finish() which means it accepts three parameters: $success, $results, and $operations: $success is true when all tasks completed without error; $results is an array of data you can feed into the $context array during processing; $operations is your operations list again.

Those functions are all expected to be static methods on classes or, more commonly, a function defined in a procedural code block imported from a separate file (which can be provided in the batch array).

My replacement batch service

It’s those blocks of procedural code and classes of nothing but static methods that bug me so much. Admittedly the batch system is convenient and works well enough to handle major tasks for lots of modules. But in Drupal 8 we have a whole suite of services and plugins that are designed to be run in specific contexts that batch does not provide by default. While we can access the Drupal service container and get the objects we need the batch code always feels clunky and out of place within a well structured module or project. What’s more I have often created batches that benefit from having the key tasks be functions of a service not just specific to the batch process.

So after several attempts to force batches and services to play nice together I finally created this module to force a marriage. Even though there are places which required a bit of compromise, but I think I have most of that contained in the abstract class so I don’t have to worry about it on a regular basis. That makes my final code with complex logic and processing far cleaner and easier to maintain.

The Batch Service Interface module provides an interface an an abstract class that implements parts of it: abstract class AbstractBatchService implements BatchServiceInterface. The developer extending that class only needs to define a service that handles generating a list of operations that call local methods of the service and the finish batch function (also as a local method). Nearly everything else is handled by the parent class.

The implementation I provided in the example submodule ends up four simple methods. Even in more complex jobs all the real work could be contained in a method that is isolated from the oddities of batch processing.

<?php

namespace Drupal\batch_example;
use Drupal\node\Entity\Node;
use Drupal\batch_service_interface\AbstractBatchService;

/**
 * Class ExampleBatchService logs the name of nodes with id provided on form.
 */
class ExampleBatchService extends AbstractBatchService {

  /**
   * Must be set in child classes to be the service name so the service can
   * bootstrap itself.
   *
   * @var string
   */
  protected static $serviceName = 'batch_example.example_batch';

  /**
   * Data from the form as needed.
   */
  public function generateBatchJob($data) {
    $ops = [];
    for ($i = 0; $i < $data['message_count']; $i++ ) {
      $ops[] = [
        'logMessage' => ['MessageIndex' => $i + 1],
      ];
    }

    return $this->prepBatchArray($this->t('Logging Messages'), $this->t('Starting Batch Processing'), $ops);
  }

  public function logMessage($data, &amp;$context) {

    $this->logger->info($this->getRandomMessage());

    if (!isset($context['results']['message_count'])) {
      $context['results']['message_count'] = 0;
    }
    $context['results']['message_count']++;

  }

  public function doFinishBatch($success, $results, $operations) {
    drupal_set_message($this->t('Logged %count quotes', ['%count' => $results['message_count']]));
  }

  public function getRandomMessage() {
    $messages = [
      // list of messages to select from
    ];

    return $messages[array_rand($messages)];

  }

}

There is the oddity that you have to tell the service its own name so it can bootstrap itself. If there is a way around that I’d love to know it. But really one have one line of code that’s a bit strange, everything else is now fairly clear call and response.

One of the nice upsides to this solution is you could write tests for the service that look and feel just like any other services tests. The methods could all be called once, and you are not trying to run tests against a procedural code block or a class that is nothing but static methods.

I would love to hear ideas about ways I could make this solution stronger. So please drop me a comment or send me a patch.

Related core efforts

There is an effort to try to do similar things in core, but they look like they have some distance left to travel. Obviously once that work is complete it is likely to be better than what I have created, but in the meantime my service allows for a new level of abstraction without waiting for core’s updates to be complete.

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