Yes I wear pants and other advice for working from home.

I’ve worked from home part-time or full-time for the past four years. The first question I’m always asked when people learn I work from home is “Do you wear pants?”. The answer is yes, I wear pants to work even when no one can see me. And frankly I don’t quite understand the desire of large numbers of people to work without pants, but it lead me to realize that it might be helpful to share a few tips for people starting to work remotely.

Wear Pants

Okay, it doesn’t have to be pants, but get up and get dressed in clothes you don’t mind being seen in. The clothes we pick communicate, not only to other people but also to ourselves. Pick clothes to help you take your work seriously.

Set a routine

Have a routine about when you start, and what you do to prepare yourself before you start for the day. Your commute might be a walk down the hall instead of a drive across town or a ride on public transit, but most people I know still benefit from a pre-work routine. Walk the dog, go for a run, eat breakfast, or some other basic activity. It doesn’t matter a whole lot what it is, but have a routine that gives you a few minutes to get settled into a frame of mind to be focused on what you are going to do at work.

Make sure the technology works

You never want to have to say “I can’t do that from here.” or “I’ll do that next time I’m in the office.” This is particularly true when you have a part-time remote arrangement (i.e. if you work from home 1 or 2 days a week), and the systems may not be setup to fully support remote workers. Push hard to get the technology fixed so you can do everything from home at least as well as you can in the office.

Have back-channels

Make sure you are set up with ways to informally communicate with colleagues. Whether that’s slack, hipchat, google hangouts, or some other tool, make sure there is a way to discuss totally unimportant stuff to maintain your personal relationships with your colleagues. When times gets stressful it’s critical to have good will built up and important to have a way to work out issues in private.

Have an office

It doesn’t have to be a nice office, but have a space you go to for work. Make sure it’s setup well for your work, and make sure you don’t spend lots of non-work time in that space. Don’t use the room with your TV or other simple distractions. Ideally you want a space with a door you can close so you can block out any other people in your home and focus.

Have boundaries

Like a morning to routine you need to have boundaries about when you are not working. Finish your day at a predictable time most days. Make sure your colleagues know when you are available outside normal hours and limit how much you let them cheat. Most importantly sometimes be truly unavailable.

Get out

Get out of your house/apartment at least once a day. When I first worked from home I realized that I’d gone a week without leaving my apartment complex, and I was starting to go stir crazy. Even if it’s just a trip to the store or a walk in the woods get out and remember there is more to the world than your work.

Be Productive

Lots of work places treat work from home as a privilege they want to take away again. Even if that doesn’t seem possible in your company, make sure you are proving you are able to be productive with the freedom working from home gives you. Ideally you have a work space free from the normal distractions of a conventional office, so use that environment to get more done than you can in the office.

Get together with colleagues

If you work remotely full-time you need to make sure you still spend face-to-face time with your colleagues. Humans are geared to appreciate time spent together, and for all the technology allows us new freedoms about where and when we work, there is still a different quality when everyone is in one place together. Some companies do this at conferences, some hold retreats, some just call the remote staff to the main office a few times a year. Figure out what makes sense for you and your company and push to make sure it happens.

Show personality

puzzleDo things that help give your colleagues insight into who you are outside work. I keep a puzzle table in my office to help me clear my head and avoid boredom during conference calls. At my previous job we did a daily stand up video conference, and some days I would put the camera at the puzzle and worked on it as we talked. It served as a friendly way to help people see me as a real person not just a source of code. Now I will share pictures of my dogs and other things that round out people’s understanding of my life.
Not all of these things are totally within your control, and you will need support from your company to make sure the environment is right for you to be successful. Work with your manager, other remote employees, and other colleagues to make sure the environment is going to allow you to be successful over time.

Let them eat Drupal Cake

Last week Cyberwoven hosted the local SC DUG. To encourage people to come when we hold these events in Columbia I’ve blatantly started to bribe people with baked goods: I give the presenter a choice of Cookies, Cake, or Pie – everyone picks cookies (unless I swap in Brownies instead of cookies then they pick brownies), no one asks for pie or cake. This month Will gave a talk about Docker and asked for cake! Since I was excited to finally have someone actually ask for something interesting I decided to do something Drupal themed:  I made Drupal Cake.

Turns out if you go Googling for Drupal cake you get ideas for how to make a yellow or white cake and decorate it with a Drupal logo. There are some notable counter examples, but I wanted something with more Drupal baked in.

So I made a Chocolate Blue Velvet Cake with a Drupal logo in blueberries.

This recipe is derived from All Cake’s Considered’s Dark-Chocolate Red Velvet Cake (if you’re an NPR-nerd you should buy a copy but it is also available in its entirety from the Internet Archive – I assume legally).

Of course hers is red, and I wanted blue. But since my actual inspiration came from people providing recipes (mostly bad ones) for baby shower cakes getting suggestions about how much food coloring to use wasn’t hard. So a little marriage of ideas and you have Chocolate Blue Velvet Drupal Cake.

Ingredients

Cake:

  • 2 Sticks of unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1 ¼ cups sugar
  • 1 ¼ cups brown sugar
  • 6 large eggs at room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ cup Dutch process cocoa
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 ounce Blue food coloring (my version didn’t have quite enough so this is an increase to get a brighter blue).

Icing:

  • ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 2 8-ounce packages cream cheese at room temperature
  • 32-ounces of confectioners’ (powdered) sugar.
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 package of fresh Blueberries

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F
  2. Cream the butter and then gradually add the sugars beating well as you go.
  3. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well between each.
  4. Add the vanilla extract and beat for another couple of minutes.
  5. In a separate bowl combine and lightly mix the dry ingredients.
  6. Alternate adding roughly ⅓ of the dry mixture followed by ⅓ of the sour cream, beating well after each addition, until all of both are fully incorporated.
  7. Add the food coloring, and continue to beat well.  After a minute stop the mixer and using a spatula to get any unevenly dyed batter off the sides and bottom, and then beat until the color is even.
  8. Pour the batter into a pair of well greased 8-inch round cake pans, and place them in the oven so they have as similar of conditions as possible.
  9. Bake for 45 minutes or until the cake tests done (whichever is later).
  10. Cool the layers in their pans for 10 minutes and then remove from their pans carefully.  Let them cool to room temperature.

Frosting:

  1. Cream the butter and the cream cheese at medium speed.
  2. Gradually add the confectioners sugar.  Continue beating until the it is light and fluffy.

To Assemble the Cake:

  1. Wait until the cake is fully cooled to room temperature. If domes formed on both layers, use a long knife to cut the top of one layer to be flat (you can do both, but you need to do the bottom layer).
  2. Place about a ⅓ of the icing in a separate bowl, and working from this smaller amount (we’ll get back to the rest later – this is just to avoid getting crumbs in your icing) put a smooth later cross the top of the bottom layer.
  3. Place the top layer on top of the bottom layer, and ice the top of the cake, and then the sides. This first layer should be fairly thin.  Give it a few minutes to dry on the surface before proceeding with the second coat.
  4. Using the rest of the icing, apply a thicker coat of icing, particularly on top.
  5. Using the blueberries attempt to create a Drupal logo pattern on the top of the cake.
Top view of the cake.
I didn’t get a picture of the inside so here’s another view of the logo – yes that’s supposed to be the Drupal 8 logo. Happy 1st birthday to Drupal 8.

Postcards for children

My sister-in-law is an ESOL teacher in Maryland. Yesterday she found herself trying comfort her class of terrified 6-8 year olds who wanted to know why America hates them. Many of her students are war refugees who have seen bombings, gunfire, and family members killed. Many of them are muslims, and even at young ages are aware of what has been said during the election about them and their families. Coming to America was supposed to mean safety and a government that would protect them, and now they fear that is gone.

Right now we can’t fix the Supreme Court, and we can’t undo all of the damage that has been done to our nation this year, but we can help these children.

We are trying to get as many people as we can from as many places as possible to send them postcards.

Tell them you’re happy they are in America.
Tell them you don’t hate Muslims.
Tell them that you love them.
Tell them whatever is in your heart.

Postcards can be sent to:

Ms. M’s Class
Templeton Elementary School
6001 Carters Lane

RiverdaleMD 20737

Lessons learned from my first Drupal 8 projects

During last month’s SCDUG I gave two presentations. I’ve already posted the Sins Against Drupal talk I gave. That didn’t take up much time, and since I had been prepping some thoughts on the first few Drupal 8 projects I gave a second short talk on what I’ve learned working with Drupal 8 during its first year.


What Projects?

Cyberwoven launched three Drupal 8 sites during the early fall of this year:

AllSouth was our first Drupal 8 site, and was actually started as a Drupal 8.0 site, and was updated to 8.1 before launch and 8.2 post launch. As a credit union AllSouth had a number of regulatory concerns that meant we had to flex a few extra muscles along the way.

Valuant is a fairly simple site that is representative of lots of standard projects.

Cyberwoven’s new site is a headless site powered by Drupal and Angular.

What’s not new?

Drupal 8 brings forward lots of concepts from Drupal 7 (and prior versions). It also brings forward a few standard community realities.

The information architecture tools are basically the same at least at the conceptual level. Nodes, Fields, Taxonomy, and Menus all still exist more or less as we’ve known them for years, and while there are differences on the surface those differences are incremental in nature and scope.

We also still have the constant hunt for modules that do what you’re doing so you don’t reinvent the wheel. Many modules that people are used to using are still missing, but new things arrive daily, and many of the new versions are significant improvements over previous generations of tools.

And there is still a lack of a clear line between front-end and back-end. When does business logic end and interface begin? When does a themer need to understand Drupal’s HTML generation vs when does a backend developer need to figure out how to force Drupal to generate carefully crafted markup?  There are opportunities to form better and clearer lines, but they aren’t automatic by any means: every team will have to solve this problem their own way.

What’s so great?

Drupal 8 opens up a collection of new tools and opportunities for the community.

  • As a backend developer you get to write modern code. The name spacing can feel a little Java-esc at times, but the ability to properly name space code, ditch globals, move from hooks to event listeners, and other basic OOP tools is incredibly nice.
  • With CKEditor in core we get better integration between that interface and the rest of Drupal. And better modules are coming out all the time to solve long standing UX annoyances. For example with the D8 Editor File upload module files and images can both be handled as Drupal file objects, but the editor can know the difference between a file (which should just be a link) and an image (which you should display).
  • The Symfony community provides a large number of packages that provide 3rd party integrations, or the tools to make them easy to build.
  • The two core base themes do not require keelhauling to make viable. If you commonly built your themes from scratch, the ability to have clean default markup that’s easy to override makes both Stable and Classy a major improvement to life.

Things you need to survive

As you dive into your first projects you need to understand that much of what you know at the detail level has changed.  And so you’ll need to learn a few new tricks and be willing to toss aside a few old ideas:

Your old build standards are wrong. Probably not entirely, but you’ll need new modules in your default builds, new best practices about when to use a node vs block vs custom entities, and other basic details you probably have really well develop standards (or at least habits) from years of working with Drupal.

If you’ve been avoiding it to-date, it’s time to develop an understanding about composer, drush, and Drupal consoleNot only do you need to be using these tools (probably all three) but you need to understand what each provides and which tool is best for which job.

Nginx is not for the faint of heart: as best I can find, no one has published a complete setup guide yet. In Drupal 6 and 7 there were pretty good guides to setting up Nginx properly, but with Drupal 8 there are enough differences that those guides don’t really work. And all the guides that I have read so far include errors (some of them significant security mistakes). To be clear, it can be done, but if you want to do it yourself be prepared to do a great deal of extra research along the way.

If you have windows you have pain. There are a number of windows specific challenges (speed and NTFS weakness being the biggest we face), and there is little community support to help you overcome the challenges.

Core patches tend to be required. Unlike Drupal 7, core and module patching is the norm not the exception. There are several issues that are frustratingly slow to get fixed that hit some fairly common use cases (like this menu block bug). While this is improving all the time, we haven’t launched a D8 site without at least one patch in place.

Cache tags are great, but require learning. The new caching system is powerful, flexible, and totally different from what we had before.  It’s better, but to use it well you’ll need to spend some time getting to know when to set and clear the tags you want to create.

Twig is great, but requires learning and discipline. I really like twig and the much cleaner syntax to brings to the theme layer.  However, as more and more people use it they are finding ways to move increasingly complex logic out of modules and theme PHP into template files. Please fight this urge! Keep your business logic separate from your display logic. If some object wasn’t loaded into a variable in your twig file do not attempt to load it in twig. If you need some 4 or 5 layer selector to get to the value you want to print: fix that in a preprocess function.

The API improvements are coming all the time and make things interesting. So far the community has stayed on schedule of rolling out new minor versions of 8 and that’s meant great new features in each version. It has also meant that sometimes a solution you built is not using the best techniques given the improvements.  That’s not really a problem, but can add headaches in maintenance cycles. Also you will find places where brand new D8 tools are already deprecated but the replacements don’t have good example implementations yet.

XML to JSON in Five lines

In closing I want to share the feature that caused me to realize that Symfony was worth the cost of admission: a 5 line XML to JSON AJAX callback.

AllSouth has an ATM Locator that links to a data provider to find all ATMs nationwide that AllSouth customers can access.  That provider has an XML-base API that cannot be accessed directly from browsers, and therefore needed to be proxied through the main site. The full details involve more than just the following lines of code (providing input checking, settings, routing, etc), but the heart of the process is just five lines.

    $client = new Client(); // 1: Create Guzzle Client
    try{
      $res = $client->get($config->get('api_endpoint'), // 2: Make request
            [
              'http_errors'=>false,
              'query' => [
                 'key'=>$config->get('coop_api_key'),
                     // ...
               ],
            ]);
      $decoderRing = new XmlEncoder(); // 3: Create XML Encoder
      $xml = $decoderRing->decode($res->getBody()); // 4: Decode the XML Response into an array. 
      return new JsonResponse($xml); // 5: Return the array as JSON
    } catch (RequestException $e) {
      throw new HttpException($this->t('Unable to process request'));
    }

Sins Against Drupal 3

This is part of my ongoing series about ways Drupal can be badly misused. These are generally times someone tried to solve an otherwise interesting problem in just about the worst possible way. All of these will start with a description of the problem, how not to solve it, and then ideas about how to solve it well.

I present these at SC Drupal Users Group meetings from time to time as an entertaining way to discuss ways we can all improve our skills.

This one was presenting during our October event here in Aiken, SC.


The Problem

Provide a custom authentication solution that allows staff to have one backend and members another.

The Sinful Solution

In order to force staff to use the staff login page, during login form validation check to see if the user is a staff member, by authenticating the user, checking their groups, and logging out staff.

The Code

/**
* Prevents staff members from logging in outside of staff login page. <<-- Why?
*/
function my_auth_staff_boot($form, &$form_state) { // NOT actually a hook_boot (thankfully) called as login form validator...
  user_authenticate($form_state['values']);
  global $user;
  if (in_array('An Employee', $user->roles)) {
    form_set_error($form['#id'], l(t('Staff must log in via staff-login', 'staff-login')), TRUE);
    drupal_set_message('Staff must log in via ' . l(t('staff-login', 'staff-login')), 'error', TRUE);
    // Load the user pages in case they have not been loaded.
    module_load_include('inc', 'user', 'user.pages');
    user_logout();
  }
}

Why is this so bad?

This code actually completes the login process before kicking the user out. Why would you ever want to do that to your users? What did they do to you? It also loads an extra file for no apparent reason just before kicking the user back out.

Better Solutions

The goal here is to control what backend the user logs into, and shouldn’t control the page they login from. So the place to look for solutions are modules that already do this and so I propose mimicking the LDAP or GAuth modules’ approaches. LDAP attaches a validator to the form and takes over authentication, but LDAP supports lots of options so the code there is too extensive to use for a clear example. So for discussion I pulled out elements of the GAuth module (although there is still lots of trimming to make this understandable).

The GAuth module adds a submit button to the form and handles all processing for that form directly.

/**
* Implements hook_form_alter().
*/
function gauth_login_form_alter(&$form, &$form_state, $form_id) {
  if ($form_id == 'user_login' || $form_id == 'user_login_block') {
    $form['submit_google'] = array(
      '#type' => 'submit',
      '#value' => t(''),
      '#submit' => array('gauth_login_user_login_submit'),
      '#limit_validation_errors' => array(),
      '#weight' => 1000,
    );
    drupal_add_css(drupal_get_path('module', 'gauth_login') . '/gauth_login.css');
  }
}

/**
* Login using google, submit handler
*/
function gauth_login_user_login_submit() {
  if (variable_get('gauth_login_client_id', FALSE)) {
// .. skipping resource validation ...

  $client = new Google_Client();
// .. skipping client setup ...
  $url = $client->createAuthUrl();
  // Send the user off to Google for processing
  drupal_goto($url);
  }
  // ... skip errors
}

From there we pass through a menu router from the main module, and an API hook to get:

function gauth_login_gauth_google_response() {
  if (isset($_GET['state'])) {
// Skipping some error traps...
    $redirect_url = isset($state['destination']) ? $state['destination'] : '';
    if (isset($_GET['code'])) {
// Skipping a bunch of Client setup...
      $oauth = new Google_Service_Oauth2($client);
      $info = $oauth->userinfo->get();
      if ($uid = gauth_login_load_google_id($info['id'])) {
        $form_state['uid'] = $uid; 
        user_login_submit(array(), $form_state); // << That right there with the $form_state['uid'] set does the magic.
      }
      else {
// Skipping other options....
      }
    }
    drupal_goto($redirect_url); // &lt;&lt; be nice and handle the destination parameter
  }
}

Share your sins

I’m always looking for new material to include in this series. If you would like to submit a problem with a terrible solution, please remove any personally identifying information about the developer or where the code is running (the goal is not to embarrass individuals), post them as a gist (or a similar public code sharing tool), and leave me a comment here about the problem with a link to the code. I’ll do my best to come up with a reasonable solution and share it with SC DUG and then here. I’m presenting next month so if you have something we want me to look at you should share it soon.

If there are security issues in the code you want to share, please report those to the site owner before you tell anyone else so they can fix it. And please make sure no one could get from the code back to the site in case they ignore your advice.